Chrimbo Limbo

How can you survive and thrive in the strange days between Christmas and New Year’s Eve?

Handschuhschneeballwerfer – German word. Definition - ‘glove snowball thrower’

Handschuhschneeballwerfer is a mildly derogatory term for someone who wears gloves to throw snowballs, as opposed to a more ‘hardcore’ snowball thrower who goes gloveless. There’s no equivalent word in English.

However, not even the German language has a word for that time between Christmas and New Year, affectionately called 'Twixmas’ by some. It’s the time of year when no one is quite sure what day it is or what you’re ‘meant’ to do. Many people relish the lack of structure and an opportunity to slow down, eat and sleep at random times without the pressure of a fixed schedule. Whatever your personal preferences, if you’re raising care-experienced children then this is probably not an option you have!

So how can you survive and thrive in ‘chrimbo limbo’?

Set expectations and be creative!

Be realistic about this time. If you know that your family can’t manage structure-free down time, flexibility around mealtimes etc., then don’t aim for it. This can be hard if this kind of relaxation time is what you love (and feel you need). It’s important to acknowledge how you feel, to grieve for what cannot be and then to set your focus on the family you’re called to.

Are there creative ways to meet the needs of your family so it feels festive, but is also achievable? When our expectations are realistic, we are less likely to feel frustrated at what isn’t happening and more able to be present and look for the joy in what is.

Find your rhythm

If you need a plan on a visual timetable for each day with your family, then do it. If you need to have the same mealtimes and visit the same places, embrace it, even though it may feel different to every other household around you.

The external pressure for Christmas to ‘look’ or ‘feel’ a certain way and to conform to the ways of the world (or the version we see on social media) can feel overwhelming. As those doing a brilliant job of loving and raising care-experienced children, you will know the things that reduce anxiety, increase felt safety and bring greater peace to your precious family, so continue to do those things.

Perhaps you need to build in rhythms that allow for one exciting morning activity, followed by some calmer moments at home. There may be places of festive joy that you know this year will offer too much sensory input for your precious ones to handle. You may need to communicate your plans with your wider family and friends and help them understand why. They might not get it. They may step in and flex with you out of their love for your family.

Find your rhythm for the season and throw yourselves in to it with energy and joy.

You matter

As you find your rhythm and work out plans that serve your family well, remember to include things for you too. Maybe it’s a treat meal or food (just for you!) or time out with friends or family?

What are the things that give you life? When you’ve identified those things, prioritise them in the schedule too. These are the things that fill our cup and means we’ve got more to pour into others.

So, whether you’re thriving or surviving during these strange few days between what has been and what is to come, we hope and pray that you find moments of loud laughter and deep rest with those near and dear to you at this time. Happy Christmas and new year, from all of us at Home for Good!

Author:
Claire at Home for Good


Date published:
December 2021


Tags:
Articles


Share:


Related pages

"I've been here before"

"I've been here before"

A care-experienced adult reflects on the past two years.

Read more

You might also be interested in

The power of people who ‘get it’

Stories

The power of people who ‘get it’

What difference you could make in the lives of those who love and are raising care-experienced children by even more intentionally journeying alongside?

Read more
Being ‘Church’

Articles

Being ‘Church’

Home for Good believe the Church is ideally placed to make a transformational difference, offering more safe and loving homes for children and teenagers who are waiting and a robust and stable support network ready to welcome and care.

Read more
Theologian in Residence

Articles

Theologian in Residence

Tim Davy tells us a bit about his role and what it means for him to work with Home for Good

Read more
Mother's Day: a different perspective

Stories

Mother's Day: a different perspective

As we celebrate Mother’s Day this year, we at Home for Good want to share the stories and amplify the voices of a number of different women as they mark this time of year. We asked them a number of questions, and it’s our privilege to share their reflections with you.

Read more

Connect locally

I would like to find out what is
going on in my area

Connect Locally

Join our mailing list for the latest Home for Good news and ways to get involved.

Together we can find a home for every child who needs one.

£
Other amount
£
Other amount

£25 per month could help us create and collate inspiring articles and blogs that encourage and inform the families and communities who care for vulnerable children